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США покладають на Росію відповідальність за припинення мандату місії ОБСЄ на кордоні з Україною

Представниця США у ОБСЄ Кортні Австріан висловила стурбованість щодо «намірів Росії виконувати свої міжнародні зобов’язання та конструктивно взаємодіяти з Україною»

Leaders From US, Australia, Japan, India to Meet Friday in Washington

Leaders of the United States, Japan, Australia and India are to meet in person Friday in Washington to discuss cooperation in the Indo-Pacific in the face of China’s growing power in the region.

Leaders of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, or the Quad – U.S. President Joe Biden, Prime Minister Scott Morrison of Australia, Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India, and Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga of Japan – met virtually in March, but Friday marks their first face-to-face summit. 

“The Quad Leaders will be focused on deepening our ties and advancing practical cooperation on areas such as combatting COVID-19, addressing the climate crisis, partnering on emerging technologies and cyberspace, and promoting a free and open Indo-Pacific,” White House spokesman Jenn Psaki said in a statement.

China has been steadily building military outposts in the region and using them to back claims it controls vital sea lanes.

The Washington meeting comes in the wake of a recently announced agreement among the U.S., Britain and Australia to supply Australia with nuclear submarines.  

The deal angered France by undercutting a deal it had with Australia to supply it with diesel submarines. France recalled its ambassadors from both the U.S. and Australia in protest.

China condemned the deal, calling it damaging to regional peace.

The Quad meeting also comes amid stronger talk by the U.S. and its allies in support of Taiwan, which China views as a rogue province, and a renewed effort by the European Union to “enhance” its naval presence in the region.

Крим: суд залишив під вартою ще одного фігуранта справи про «диверсію на загопроводі»

Азіз Ахтемов залишиться під арештом щонайменше до 2 листопада

Sam in South Atlantic, Expected to Become Major Hurricane

The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Hurricane Sam has formed in the southern Atlantic. It is the seventh hurricane of the season and is likely to become a major hurricane in the next 24 hours.

In their latest report, forecasters at the hurricane center say Sam is still a long way from land, more than 2,300 kilometers east-northeast of the northern Leeward Islands of the Caribbean.

But its maximum sustained winds are at 120 km/h and rapid intensification is forecast to continue. Sam is likely to become a Category 3 hurricane late Friday or early Saturday, with winds of at least 178 km/h.

Colorado State University Meteorologist and hurricane specialist Philip Klotzbach, on Twitter, said that if Sam reaches major hurricane status, it will be the fourth storm to do so this season. Since satellite forecasting began in 1966, there have been only seven previous years with four or more major Atlantic hurricanes.  

Klotzbach says the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season is already trending more active than average, with 18 named storms and seven hurricanes, compared to the average of 10 and four. There have been nearly 56 days with active named storms compared to the average of about 47 per season.  

Klotzbach also notes that the average date for the seventh Atlantic hurricane to form is November 16, putting this season way ahead of normal.

Forecasters remain unsure if Sam’s track poses a threat to land as some forecast models have it tracking safely northward, while others put it closer to the Leeward Islands by early next week.

Від України на «Оскар» претендуватиме стрічка «Погані дороги»

Під час голосування стрічка Наталки Ворожбит «Погані дороги» отримала 5 голосів та 3 додаткові бали

Заступник Кличка Крищенко відреагував на розслідування «Схем» про захоплені причали та острів

У розслідуванні йшлося про те, як численні об’єкти прибережної зони Києва та області перейшли у приватні руки через дії поліції Києва, коли нею керував Крищенко

Члену виборчкому в окупованому Криму змінили підозру і оголосили в розшук – прокуратура

Членкиню так званого «виборчкому Криму» підозрюють у державній зраді та посяганні на територіальну цілісність України

Arizona County says Cyber Ninjas Election Review Shows Biden Win

Arizona’s most populous county has confirmed that a draft report of a partisan audit of its vote count in the 2020 presidential election declares Joe Biden as the winner.

The report by Cyber Ninjas, a little known Florida-based cybersecurity company, shows Maricopa County’s result in November was correct, the county tweeted late Thursday.

“The #azaudit draft report from Cyber Ninjas confirms the county’s canvass of the 2020 General Election was accurate and the candidates certified as the winners did, in fact, win,” it wrote.

The conclusion, which is expected to be released publicly Friday, effectively ends the discredited Republican-led bid to throw out Biden’s victory there in favor of former president Donald Trump.

Maricopa County did not publish the draft report and Cyber Ninjas did not immediately respond to an AFP request.

Biden’s victory in the key Arizona county was the first by a Democratic presidential nominee in decades.

Trump supporters and organizations who claim he was cheated out of an election win, including some who have also peddled wild conspiracy theories, funded the review to the tune of millions of dollars.

Since his crushing election defeat, Trump has resurfaced to criticize his successor.

In July, at his first campaign-style rally since leaving the White House, he repeated the lie that he won November’s election and that Biden prevailed only through fraud.

Trump, who has been booted from social media and was impeached for inciting the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the US Capitol, may yet seek reelection in 2024 but has not announced his plans. 

 

Female Leaders to Speak at UN General Assembly

Eight women – three vice presidents and five prime ministers – are scheduled to speak Friday at the United Nations General Assembly.

“We cannot save our planet if we leave out the vulnerable – the women, the girls the minorities,” Slovakian President Zuzana Caputova told the assembly earlier in the week.

“COVID-19 is threatening to roll back the gains that we have made,” Tanzanian President Samia Suluhu Hassan, the first female president of her country, told the U.N. body Thursday.

Also Thursday, the U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres warned at a food summit that seeks to improve global food production and access that nearly half the planet cannot afford healthy food.

“Food is life. But in countries, communities and households in every corner of the world, this essential need — this human right — is going unfulfilled,” Guterres told the virtual Food Systems Summit on the sidelines of the General Assembly’s annual gathering.

Guterres said that 3 billion people cannot afford nutritious food.

“Every day, hundreds of millions of people go to bed hungry. Children are starving,” he said.

While millions starve and famine is a reality in parts of Yemen and Ethiopia, nearly one-third of all food production is lost or wasted.

The summit, in the works for more than a year, aims to take a fresh look at every aspect of food production to make it more environmentally friendly, safe, nutritious and accessible. It is also part of advancing the U.N.’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals, among which “zero hunger” is a top priority.

Pandemic increases challenge

“The COVID-19 pandemic has made this challenge much greater,” Guterres said. “It has deepened inequalities, decimated economies [and] plunged millions into extreme poverty.”

The virus was also on the minds of the leaders who addressed the General Assembly Thursday — particularly the African leaders, who made up a large portion of the day’s speakers. Many appeared by video message because of the pandemic.

“It is an indictment on humanity that more than 82% of the world’s vaccine doses have been acquired by wealthy countries, while less than 1% has gone to low-income countries,” South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said in a video address.

The African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 4% of Africa’s population is fully vaccinated.

“The hoarding and inequitable distribution with the resultant uneven vaccination patterns across the globe is not acceptable,” Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa said in a prerecorded message. “Vaccine nationalism is self-defeating and contrary to the mantra that ‘no one is safe until everyone is safe.’ Whether in the global North or South, rich or poor, old or young, all people of the world deserve access to vaccines.”

There was also concern about the trend toward coups in Africa. In the past year, military coups have taken place in Chad, Mali and Guinea. Sudan’s military said it put down an attempted coup there just this week. In Tunisia, some argue that President Kais Saied essentially pulled off a coup, invoking emergency powers, firing the prime minister and suspending the parliament to consolidate his authority.

Angolan President João Gonçalves Lourenço said there has not been sufficient reaction from other countries to discourage these coups.

“We consider it necessary that the international community act with resolve and does not simply issue statements of condemnation in order to force those actors to return power to the legitimately established institutions,” he told the gathering. “We cannot continue to allow recent examples, such as those of Guinea and others, to succeed in Africa and other continents.”

In the Middle East, Iraqi President Barham Salih expressed concern about terrorism in his country and the wider region.

“We cannot understate the danger posed by terrorism. If we become lax and distracted by regional conflicts, we will simply see the return of obscurantist forces that will threaten our people and our security,” he said. “Cooperation and solidarity are our only choice in our fight against international terrorism and the groups that support it.”

Other speakers Thursday included Cuban President Miguel Díaz-Canel Bermúdez, President Nayib Bukele of El Salvador and Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi.

Reconciliation

Meanwhile, the opportunities provided this week for intensive diplomacy helped ease a rare rift in U.S.-French relations.

French officials were outraged by a security pact made between Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States earlier this month. Under the arrangement, Australia will receive at least eight nuclear-powered submarines, to be built in Australia using American technology. The agreement came as Australia pulled out of an earlier deal for French submarines worth tens of billions of dollars.

A phone meeting between Presidents Joe Biden and Emmanuel Macron on Wednesday and an in-person meeting Thursday between their top diplomats on the margins of the General Assembly in New York appear to have gone a long way to calming Paris and rebuilding confidence.

Some information in this report came from the Associated Press. 

 

Головне на ранок: евакуація з Афганістану, новий вирок Крисіну та закон про олігархів

Голова Моніторингової місії ООН з прав людини в Україні Матильда Богнер в Києві згадала про катування Владислава Єсипенка та «справу Чубарова»

24 вересня – що очікувати в цей день і що було в історії

2004 року в Івано-Франківську під час президентської виборчої кампанії 17-річний студент-економіст Дмитро Романюк поцілив яйцем у тодішнього прем’єр-міністра України, кандидата в президенти Віктора Януковича, після чого той впав і був відвезений до лікарні

Знущання над полоненими незаконної в’язниці у Донецькому телецентрі – ОГП повідомив про підозру 3 особам

Наразі вирішується питання щодо оголошення підозрюваних в розшук

Для втілення закону про олігархів «потрібні прозорість і антимонопольні заходи» – Сіммонс

За словами дипломатки, для втілення закону потрібні «реальна конкуренція в енергетичному секторі, сильне суспільне мовлення та судова реформа»

UN Spotlights Need for Producing Healthy Food for All

Nearly half the planet cannot afford healthy food, the United Nations secretary-general warned at a food summit Thursday that seeks to improve global food production and access.

“Food is life. But in countries, communities and households in every corner of the world, this essential need — this human right — is going unfulfilled,” Antonio Guterres told the virtual Food Systems Summit on the sidelines of the General Assembly’s annual gathering.

Guterres noted that 3 billion people cannot afford nutritious food.

“Every day, hundreds of millions of people go to bed hungry. Children are starving,” he said.

While millions starve and famine is a reality in parts of Yemen and Ethiopia, nearly one-third of all food production is lost or wasted.

The summit, in the works for more than a year, aims to take a fresh look at every aspect of food production to make it more environmentally friendly, safe, nutritious and accessible. It is also part of advancing the U.N.’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals, among which “zero hunger” is a top priority.

Pandemic increases challenge

“The COVID-19 pandemic has made this challenge much greater,” Guterres said. “It has deepened inequalities, decimated economies [and] plunged millions into extreme poverty.”

The virus was also on the minds of the leaders who addressed the General Assembly Thursday — particularly the African leaders, who made up a large portion of the day’s speakers. Many appeared by video message because of the pandemic.

“It is an indictment on humanity that more than 82% of the world’s vaccine doses have been acquired by wealthy countries, while less than 1% has gone to low-income countries,” South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said in a video address.

The African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 4% of Africa’s population is fully vaccinated.

“The hoarding and inequitable distribution with the resultant uneven vaccination patterns across the globe is not acceptable,” Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa said in a prerecorded message. “Vaccine nationalism is self-defeating and contrary to the mantra that ‘no one is safe until everyone is safe.’ Whether in the global North or South, rich or poor, old or young, all people of the world deserve access to vaccines.”

There was also concern about the trend toward coups in Africa. In the past year, military coups have taken place in Chad, Mali and Guinea. Sudan’s military said it put down an attempted coup there just this week. And in Tunisia, some argue that President Kais Saied essentially pulled off a coup, invoking emergency powers, firing the prime minister and suspending the parliament to consolidate his authority.

Angolan President João Gonçalves Lourenço said there has not been sufficient reaction from the international community to discourage these coups from happening.

“We consider it necessary that the international community act with resolve and does not simply issue statements of condemnation in order to force those actors to return power to the legitimately established institutions,” he told the gathering. “We cannot continue to allow recent examples, such as those of Guinea and others, to succeed in Africa and other continents.”

In the Middle East, Iraqi President Barham Salih expressed concern about terrorism in his country and the wider region.

“We cannot understate the danger posed by terrorism. If we become lax and distracted by regional conflicts, we will simply see the return of obscurantist forces that will threaten our people and our security,” he warned. “Cooperation and solidarity are our only choice in our fight against international terrorism and the groups that support it.”

Other speakers Thursday included Cuban President Miguel Díaz-Canel Bermúdez, President Nayib Bukele of El Salvador and Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi.

Reconciliation

Meanwhile, the opportunities provided this week for intensive diplomacy helped ease a rare rift in U.S.-Franco relations.

French officials were outraged by a security pact made between Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States (AUKUS) earlier this month. Under the arrangement, Australia will receive at least eight nuclear-powered submarines, to be built in Australia using American technology. The agreement came as Australia pulled out of an earlier deal for French submarines worth tens of billions of dollars.

A phone meeting between Presidents Joe Biden and Emmanuel Macron on Wednesday and an in-person meeting Thursday between their top diplomats on the margins of the General Assembly in New York appear to have gone a long way to calming Paris and rebuilding confidence.

VOA’s Chris Hannas contributed to this report. 

Rights Groups Say US Has Long History of Mistreating Haitian Migrants

Images of U.S. Border Patrol agents pursuing Haitian migrants on horseback to prevent thousands of asylum seekers from entering the U.S. have sparked widespread condemnation. But human rights advocates say the mistreatment of Haitian migrants is nothing new and that the recent incident at the U.S.-Mexico border is just the latest example of discrimination Haitians face as they seek safety in the United States.

 

“The Biden administration should actively confront and address the history of systemic racism in U.S. immigration enforcement, and urgently overhaul racially discriminatory policies,” said Alison Parker, managing director of Human Rights Watch’s U.S. Program, in an email to VOA. 

 

Testifying before Congress this week, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas promised a swift investigation of the tactics Border Patrol agents deployed against Haitian migrants. 

 

“DHS does not tolerate the abuse of migrants in our custody and we take these allegations very seriously,” the department said in a statement. “We are committed to processing migrants in a safe, orderly, and humane way. We can and must do this in a way that ensures the safety and dignity of migrants.”

For more than a year, migrants of all nationalities have been turned back at the U.S. border under a federal health code, Title 42, that precludes them from filing asylum claims during the coronavirus pandemic. Implemented by the former Trump administration, Title 42 has been retained by the Biden administration with exemptions for unaccompanied minors and some families with very young children.

While U.S. authorities have used Title 42 to expel thousands of Haitian migrants encamped on the banks of the Rio Grande near an international bridge in Del Rio, Texas, immigrant rights advocates say rapid mass expulsions of Haitians long predate the pandemic.

Immediate expulsions

During the Francois and Jean-Claude Duvalier regimes, which lasted more than two decades and ended in 1986, hundreds of thousands fled Haiti. And through the years, immigration watchers say, the U.S. government under successive administrations created policies that blocked, expelled and deported Haitians.

The Haitian Bridge Alliance and Human Rights First said that in 1978, the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) established a program to expel Haitian asylum applicants as rapidly as possible, resulting in more than 4,000 Haitians being removed from the U.S.

Yet, Haitian asylum seekers continued to come to the United States. Between 1981 and 1991, about 25,000 Haitians were interdicted at sea and many returned to Haiti without being screened for asylum relief.

More than a decade later, under the Obama administration, the government adopted the policy of metering, a practice that limited the number of migrants entering U.S. territory, and immediately turned back asylum seekers at ports of entry. The method was solidified under the Trump administration, which eventually adopted a policy called Migrant Protection Policy (MPP), which required asylum-seekers to await their proceedings in Mexico, often in the country’s dangerous northern border cities.

Relying on a health code

Immigrant advocates have sued the U.S. government over the use of Title 42, and a federal judge earlier this month ordered a halt to the expulsion of migrant families. The Biden administration is appealing the decision, which would go into effect Sept. 30.

In the meantime, U.S. immigration officials are continuing the repatriation flights. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security said that since Sunday, 1,949 Haitian nationals had been returned to Haiti on 17 flights.

According to the DHS, 3,100 migrants remained in the Del Rio sector and 3,901 Haitian nationals had been moved from the Del Rio camp to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) custody or to other sectors of the United States border to either be expelled via Title 42 or placed into removal proceedings.

 

Officials also said they believe “several thousand” Haitian migrants crossed back to Mexico. At one point, there were 15,000 people at the camp, two-thirds of them parents and children traveling as families.

A DHS spokesperson told VOA repatriation flights will continue on a regular basis and migrants who cannot be expelled under Title 42 or do not have a legal basis to remain in the U.S. are being placed in expedited or full removal proceedings.

“Individuals who are not immediately repatriated are either placed in Alternatives to Detention, detained in an ICE facility, or released with a legal document (either a Notice to Appear in court or a notice to report to an ICE office for further immigration processing),” the spokesperson said.

Denise Bell, researcher for refugee and migrant rights at Amnesty International USA, said the U.S. is “flouting” not only international human rights standards and international treaties, but also “our own law.”

“And that’s what’s so shocking and disgraceful,” Bell said.

Bell sees the low rate of asylum case approvals for Haitian migrants as symptomatic of systemic racism that immigrants of color, especially Black immigrants, face generally in U.S. society.

“And if we look at the rates of approval, particularly for people from Haiti, for example, they’re just not given the same equitable fair access to asylum as other people because their claims are summarily not considered eligible instead of actually probing to see if they would meet a standard,” she said.

DHS did not respond to repeated VOA requests for comment.

However, while historically rejecting many migrants at sea and on land, the United States has given more than 50,000 Haitians Temporary Protected Status, a designation that allows individuals from nations suffering armed conflict or natural disasters to live and work in the United States for a limited period of time.

According to the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) at Syracuse University, so far in fiscal year 2021, 10,721 Haitian nationals have been put into the deportation process in the immigration court system, a significant spike over last year’s number of 4,537.

Horses and migrants

Responding to the firestorm created by the actions of mounted Border Patrol agents, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said on Thursday the U.S. government is working with the International Organization on Migration to ensure that returning migrants are met at Haitian airports and provided immediate assistance.

Psaki said President Joe Biden has been horrified by the photos of the border patrol officers on horseback and added they have “taken very specific action” and launched an investigation.

On Thursday, DHS suspended the use of horse patrols in Del Rio, Texas.

 

 

Police: Shooter in Tennessee Kills 1, Injures 12, Apparently Kills Self

A shooting at a Tennessee grocery store left one person dead and 12 others injured Thursday afternoon, and the shooter was subsequently found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound at the store east of Memphis, authorities said.

Collierville Police Chief Dale Lane said the shooting broke out at a Kroger store in his suburban community about 30 miles (50 kilometers) east of Memphis. He said 13 people in all were shot and 12 of them were taken to hospitals, some with very serious injuries.

He said a police SWAT team and other officers went aisle to aisle in the store to find people who had sought cover or were in hiding, removing them to safety.

“We found people hiding in freezers, in locked offices. They were doing what they had been trained to do: run, hide, fight,” the chief said.

The identities of the shooter and the victims were not immediately released.

Lane said it was a sad day for his department as he spoke at a news conference after the shooting near the scene.

“I’ve been involved in this for 34 years and I’ve never seen anything like it,” he told reporters.

He added investigators were working to sort out what happened, adding, “It’s going to take a little bit before we know what happened.”

French Foreign Minister to US: Repairing Ties Will Take ‘Time’ 

French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Thursday that it would take “time” and “actions” to repair ties with the U.S. in the wake of a submarine deal that undercut a French agreement to supply Australia with diesel subs. 

Last week, the United States, United Kingdom and Australia announced a deal under which the U.K. and U.S. will instead supply Australia with nuclear-powered submarines. 

The move angered France, which withdrew its ambassadors from the U.S. and Australia. 

Earlier in the week, Le Drian expressed concern about what he characterized as “deceit” by one of its oldest allies. 

He told reporters at the United Nations this week that the United States had gone behind France’s back and had hidden the new deal for months. 

According to State Department spokesperson Ned Price, Le Drian and Blinken “spoke about plans for in-depth bilateral consultations on issues of strategic importance. They discussed the EU strategy for cooperation in the Indo-Pacific.” 

On Wednesday, President Joe Biden and French President Emmanuel Macron spoke by phone in an attempt to rebuild trust between the NATO allies. 

Some information for this report came from Reuters. 

Численні причали, дамби та цілий острів безкоштовно перейшли у приватні руки через дії поліції Києва – «Схеми»

Як юристу-бізнесмену вдалося привласнити об’єкти прибережної зона та до чого тут Нацполіція?

Нападники цілили у водія, щоб зупинити машину Шефіра – Геращенко

Після початку стрільби водій інстинктивно натиснув на гальма. Але Шефір, перебуваючи на задньому сидінні, сказав йому гнати, і водій натиснув на педаль газу

Сербські війська підвищили бойову готовність на кордоні з Косовом

Напруженість на кордоні, котрий в Сербії називають адміністративною лінією, триває від 19 вересня

Chinese Officials Warn of Fallout from Potential Evergrande Default 

Chinese officials are bracing for a potential financial crisis as giant real estate conglomerate China Evergrande Group appears to be unable to make good on bond payments due on Thursday. 

According to the Wall Street Journal, the central government has instructed local officials across the country to begin “getting ready for the possible storm,” if the firm is unable to come to an agreement with creditors. Evergrande is currently carrying a staggering load of more than $300 billion in debts and other liabilities. 

The central government in China is concerned about civil unrest because of both the size and the nature of Evergrande. The company has more than 800 construction projects spread across every province in the country, employing thousands of Chinese workers and engaging with an untold number of suppliers.

Many of the projects are housing units for which individual buyers paid large sums of money in advance. In some cases, construction has already been halted because the company has been unable to pay suppliers.

In addition to angry homeowners, the company is facing complaints from individual investors who have placed money in the company’s publicly traded shares. Since July of 2020, the company’s share price has plummeted by 91%, to about 34 cents a share today. 

Actual default may be postponed 

Evergrande had two major bond payments due Thursday. One, denominated in U.S. dollars, was for $83.5 million. The agreement with creditors gives the company a 30-day grace period before it is officially considered to be in default. However, failure to make payment on the due date will be seen as a very bad sign by the financial markets. 

The second bond payment was denominated in Chinese renminbi, and the company announced Wednesday that the debt had been “resolved through off-exchange negotiations” — though what exactly that means and how much the company actually paid is not clear. 

In addition to its real estate holdings, Evergrande has a wide array of subsidiaries, including an electric vehicle manufacturer, a soccer team, two theme parks, and a life insurance company, among other things. The company has been trying to sell off some of those assets to help pay its debts, but so far it does not appear to have been successful in raising enough cash to satisfy its creditors. 

The company’s chairman, Hui Ka Yan, has been striving to instill confidence in the company. In a memo to employees this week, he praised the company’s workforce as “an invincible army that is loyal and bears hardship without complaint.”

Hui added, “I firmly believe that Evergrande people’s spirit of never admitting defeat, and becoming stronger when the going gets tough, is our source of strength in overcoming all difficulties!” He promised that the company would emerge from its “darkest hour.” 

Government intervention possible 

Signals from the Chinese government about its intentions toward Evergrande have been mixed. In recent weeks, the government has not suggested that it intends to help the company. On Wednesday, the government issued a vaguely worded statement urging the company to “avoid near-term default” on its dollar-denominated bonds. 

Many experts believe the Chinese government will step in if it appears that Evergrande is facing collapse — deeming it too big to fail. However, that does not mean that all stakeholders in the company will be made whole. Most likely to be hurt are those holding the company’s U.S. dollar-denominated debt, who will face a “haircut” — meaning that they will be forced to accept payments of less than they are owed by the massive company. 

“It’s unlikely that the Chinese government will allow chaos to ensue,” said Doug Barry, a spokesman for the U.S.-China Business Council. “They have plenty of money to cover the losses, though foreign bond holders may receive a sizable haircut.” 

Major restructuring possible 

Experts expect that the Chinese government eventually will organize a major restructuring of the company. That would involve selling off large parts of Evergrande to other Chinese companies — probably state-owned firms. Those transactions would likely be facilitated by funding from state-owned banks. 

The goal, experts say, would be to avoid the collapse of housing projects that the company has already sold to Chinese buyers, and the related loss of construction jobs and related economic activity that would entail. 

“The government may help in restructuring Evergrande with shareholders and bondholders taking a big hit,” said Robert Dekle, a professor of economics at the University of Southern California. “This is overall good for China, reducing over-borrowing and moral hazard in the future.” 

A positive change 

Although a restructuring of Evergrande would be painful — especially for its investors — it could have important positive implications for the future of the Chinese economy. The country is currently dotted with thousands of “zombie” companies that have been kept solvent only by continued infusions of cash from state-owned banks. By refusing to bail out Evergrande’s bondholders and investors, the Chinese government may be signaling that in the future, companies will be expected to stand — or fall — on their own. 

“Longer term, China needs to get its financial house in order, especially throwing light on the shadow economy where even more debt bombs and zombie companies may lurk,” said Barry, of the U.S.-China Business Council. “Odds are good that the government will get on top of things without serious damage to the domestic or global economy. It’s a sobering reminder of the role China plays and the need for more transparency and fewer shadows and casino activities.” 

Global contagion seen as unlikely 

Evergrande’s troubles have caused investors in other high-yield Chinese debt to become cautious, demanding much higher interest rates to compensate for the perception of increased risk. 

However, experts believe that the fallout from the company’s troubles will have limited impact outside of China.

“Apparently there are other Chinese property developers in trouble,” said Dekle, the USC economist. “But the fact that Chinese authorities have allowed the firm to reach near bankruptcy suggests that the fallout will be self contained.” 

Voice of America Mandarin Service reporter Mo Yu contributed to this story. 

 

US Envoy to Haiti Quits Over ‘Inhumane’ Deportation of Migrants

The special U.S. envoy to Haiti has abruptly resigned, attacking the administration of President Joe Biden for what he characterized as its “inhumane” and “counterproductive” decision to deport thousands of Haitian migrants back to the Caribbean country.

 

Ambassador Daniel Foote, who has held the position for just two months, sent his resignation Wednesday to Secretary of State Antony Blinken, contending the U.S. approach to Haiti “remains deeply flawed.” He said his advice had been “ignored and dismissed” in Washington “when not edited to project a different narrative from my own.”

Since Sunday, the U.S. has been flying hundreds of Haitian migrants back to their homeland after they flocked to the U.S.-Mexican border in Del Rio, Texas, in hopes of entering and then staying in the United States. Many of the migrants, however, have not lived in Haiti for a decade, having moved to Chile, Brazil or other South American countries after escaping the rubble of Haiti’s massive 2010 earthquake.

 

The U.S. has allowed thousands of the Haitian migrants into the U.S. to seek asylum but is sending others back on up to seven flights a day to Port-au-Prince, the Haitian capital, or to the country’s second-biggest city, Cap-Haitien.

 

‘Simply false’

State Department spokesperson Ned Price rebuffed Foote’s complaints, saying his views, along with those of others, “were fully considered in a rigorous and transparent policy process. Some of those proposals were determined to be harmful to our commitment to the promotion of democracy in Haiti and were rejected during the policy process. For him to say his proposals were ignored is simply false.”

 

The top U.S. diplomatic agency said it was “unfortunate that instead of participating in a solutions-oriented policy process, Special Envoy Foote has both resigned and mischaracterized the circumstances of his resignation. He failed to take advantage of ample opportunity to raise concerns about migration during his tenure and chose to resign instead.”

In his resignation letter, Foote, a career diplomat, said, “The people of Haiti, mired in poverty, hostage to terror, kidnappings, robberies, and massacres of armed gangs and suffering under a corrupt government with gang alliances, simply cannot support the forced infusion of thousands of returned migrants lacking food, shelter, and money without additional, avoidable human tragedy.”

 

Foote’s attack on the government’s Haitian deportations is the latest complaint about the chaotic scene at the border at Del Rio, where as many as 14,000 Haitians encamped last weekend under an international bridge between the U.S. and Mexico.

 

The number now has been sharply cut with the deportations of hundreds of Haitians and the U.S. processing of even more migrants to stay on U.S. soil on the promise they will report to an immigration office within 60 days for asylum claims.

Numerous human rights groups have called for ending the deportations, while conservative Republican critics of Biden have assailed his administration for allowing thousands of Haitians into the U.S. rather than forcing them to make their asylum claims from wherever they were living before trekking through Mexico to reach the United States.

 

Horse patrols suspended

Meanwhile, U.S. immigration officials are investigating widely viewed videos and photographs of U.S. border agents on horseback corralling some Haitian migrants last Sunday to push them back toward Mexico.

 

The actions of the agents have been widely condemned by the White House and top government officials, but no conclusions have been reached yet about how the agents were performing their jobs. On Thursday, the Department of Homeland Security temporarily suspended use of horse patrols at the border.

 

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Wednesday the U.S. is deporting Haitians to their homeland under a health code provision citing the coronavirus pandemic as a reason to clear the border as quickly as possible.

These deportees are being sent home without the opportunity to request asylum proceedings, while others are being registered and permitted, at least for weeks, to stay on U.S. soil. Officials say there are various reasons why individuals may not be expelled.  

 

Seven flights to Haiti are set for Thursday.  

 

Immigration activists say the migrants being deported should be allowed to make asylum claims to stay in the U.S.

Leading Democrat speaks out

 

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, normally an ally of Biden, this week urged the U.S. leader and Homeland Security chief Alejandro Mayorkas “to immediately put a stop to these expulsions,” contending the flights echoed “the hateful and xenophobic” policies of former president Donald Trump “that disregard our refugee laws.”  

 

Mayorkas told a congressional hearing that government officials hope to clear out the migrant camp under the bridge at Del Rio within the next nine or 10 days.  

 

“We expect to see dramatic results in the next 48 to 96 hours, and we’ll have a far better sense in the next two days,” he said.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott, a staunch critic of Biden’s administration and its handling of migrants at the border, ordered state workers to line up dozens of state-owned cars in a kilometers-long “steel wall” to prevent more migrants from surging past overwhelmed U.S. border agents into Texas.  

 

The Texas governor blamed the Biden administration for the chaos at the border.  

 

“When you have an administration that is not enforcing the law in this country, when you have an administration that has abandoned any pretense of securing the border and securing our sovereignty, you see the onrush of people,” Abbott said earlier this week at a news conference in Del Rio.

 

У G7 «розчаровані» графіком конкурсу Ради суддів для відбору кандидатів до Етичної ради ВРП

«Запропонований графік не відображає важливості та невідкладності цієї реформи»

Зеленський привітав ухвалення закону про олігархів

«Україна відкрита для великого бізнесу, але не для олігархічного впливу на чиновників, політиків і медіа»