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Black Female Fighter Pilot Joins Navy Ranks

The U.S. Navy says it has its first Black female fighter pilot.The Naval Air Training Command tweeted that Lt. j.g. Madeline Swegle is the Navy’s “first known Black female [tactical aircraft] pilot.”The 2017 Naval Academy graduate recently completed her Tactical Aircraft training and will receive her “Wings of Gold” insignia later this month.Military.com says that a 2018 investigation it conducted with Navy-provided data revealed that only 1.9 percent of the service’s pilots assigned to fighter jets were Black.   Swegle is assigned to the Redhawks of Training Squadron 21 in Kingsville, Texas.     

For Brazil’s Bolsonaro: A Week of Isolation, Hydroxychloroquine

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro spent his first week in isolation doing the things he’d scoffed at for months: wearing a face mask and practicing social distancing.Bolsonaro, who said Tuesday he had tested positive for the coronavirus, is taking the unproven drug hydroxychloroquine. On Saturday, his wife said her test and those of her two daughters came back negative.Bolsonaro, who said his symptoms are aches, fever and malaise, has a new routine of virtual meetings and Facebook live broadcasts spent in the company of a few aides who had previously tested positive. Not so long ago Bolsonaro was attending rallies and going out to mix and mingle.“I’m sorry I can’t interact with you here. Not even next week will it be possible, because I think I will not yet be completely free of the virus, so I will not have anyone on my side here,” Bolsonaro said on his weekly Facebook broadcast Thursday.Brazil, with 1,071 new deaths Saturday, has a total of nearly 71,500 deaths and 1.9 million confirmed cases. The South American nation trails only the United States in cases and deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data.Worldwide, there are more than 12.6 million confirmed cases and more than 560,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.In Iran on Saturday, President Hassan Rouhani said the nation’s economy must stay open despite a rise in the number of coronavirus infections. He called for a ban on large gatherings, such as at weddings and wakes, to limit the spread of the virus.Iran reported Saturday that in the previous 24 hours, there had been 2,397 new COVID-19 cases and 188 deaths related to the virus, for a more than 255,000 confirmed cases and a death toll of more than 12,600. The country, which has a population of more than 80 million, ranks ninth globally in the number of cases and deaths due to the coronavirus.“We must ban ceremonies and gatherings all over the country, whether it be wakes, weddings or parties,” Rouhani said, according to a Reuters report. Shortly after he spoke, Tehran police closed all wedding and mourning venues until further notice, the wire service reported.Also Saturday, in India, Biocon, an Indian biopharmaceutical company, told Reuters it had received regulatory approval for its drug Itolizumab to be used in India on coronavirus-infected patients suffering from moderate to severe respiratory distress.Itolizumab also is used to cure the skin disease psoriasis.India, with a population of nearly 1.4 billion people, has recorded 820,000 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and a death toll of 22,000.In Australia, Victoria’s capital city of Melbourne has begun a six-week lockdown because of a spike in coronavirus cases.“Nobody is enjoying being locked at home. It is frustrating, it is challenging, but the strategy will be successful if we all play our part,” Daniel Andrews, the premier of Victoria state, said Saturday.Victoria reported 216 new cases Saturday, down from 288 Friday.“We will see more and more additional cases,” Andrews said. “This is going to be with us for months and months.”Australia’s seven other states and territories reported 11 new cases Saturday.Anthony Fauci, the top U.S. infectious-disease expert, warned that the pandemic is worsening in the U.S. because the country lacks a coherent strategy to contain the virus.“As a country, when we compare ourselves to other countries, I don’t think you can say we are doing great. I mean, we’re just not,” Fauci said in a recent interview.Fauci suggested earlier this week that states struggling to combat the virus “should seriously look at shutting down,” despite state efforts to reopen in order to revive their economies.Dozens of U.S. Marines have been infected on the Japanese island of Okinawa, officials said. They said the U.S. military asked that the exact figure not be released.“We now have strong doubts that the U.S. military has taken adequate disease prevention measures,” Gov. Denny Tamaki told reporters.On Saturday, the United States reported more than 66,000 new infections, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the latest in a string of record-breaking days.The U.S. remains the hardest-hit country, with about one-quarter of all confirmed infections and fatalities worldwide. As of late Saturday, more than 3.2 million people in the U.S. had contracted the virus and more than 134,000 had died from the disease, according to Johns Hopkins University.On Saturday, Disney World in the Southern U.S. state of Florida opened to tourists after nearly four months, with guidelines in place to help prevent spreading the coronavirus.Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom and Animal Kingdom reopened Saturday; Epcot and Disney’s Hollywood Studios will open next week.Among the many guidelines put in place: a mandatory mask rule, social distancing required; guests will not be allowed to hop between parks; and the popular daily fireworks shows and parades have been suspended to help limit drawing large crowds.  

Trump Dons Mask to Visit Wounded US Troops at Military Hospital

U.S. President Donald Trump put on a face mask Saturday for his visit with American service members at a military hospital outside Washington.Trump, who has mostly avoided wearing a mask in public, said he would wear one during his visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, telling Fox News “it’s a very appropriate thing” to do in a hospital setting.The president said that in addition to meeting with wounded soldiers, he would meet with workers tasked with containing the spread of the new coronavirus.Trump has been criticized for not wearing a mask or promoting the use of them, even within his Republican Party in recent weeks.His visit with the troops and employees comes amid surges of COVID-19 cases in the U.S., which continues to lead the world in both infections and fatalities.More than 3.2 million people in the U.S. were infected with the virus as of Saturday, about one-quarter of the almost 12.6 million cases worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University statistics.The more than 134,000 deaths in the U.S. represent over one-fourth of the nearly 562,000 COVID-19 fatalities throughout the world.Trump last visited Walter Reed in November 2019. The visit was unscheduled and secretive, and was described by the White House as an “interim checkup” nine months after his previous medical examination.The White House dismissed speculation about any “urgent or acute” issues involving Trump’s health.

Mueller Defends Russia Probe, Says Stone Remains a Felon

Former special counsel Robert Mueller sharply defended his investigation into ties between Russia and Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, writing in a newspaper opinion piece Saturday that the probe was of “paramount importance” and asserting that Trump ally Roger Stone “remains a convicted felon” despite the president’s decision to commute his sentence.The op-ed in The Washington Post marked Mueller’s first public statement on his investigation since his congressional appearance last July. It represented his firmest defense of the two-year probe, whose results have come under attack and even been partially undone by the Trump administration, including the president’s extraordinary move Friday evening to grant clemency to Stone just days before he was to report to prison.Mueller said that though he had intended for his 448-page report on the investigation to speak for itself, he felt compelled to “respond both to broad claims that our investigation was illegitimate and our motives were improper, and to specific claims that Roger Stone was a victim of our office.  “The Russia investigation was of paramount importance. Stone was prosecuted and convicted because he committed federal crimes. He remains a convicted felon, and rightly so,” Mueller wrote.Mueller did not specify who was making the claims, but it appeared to be an obvious reference to Trump, who as recently as Saturday derided the investigation as this “whole political witch hunt and the Mueller scam.”The mere publication of the op-ed was striking in itself for the former FBI director, who was tight-lipped during the investigation, refusing to respond to attacks by the president or his allies or to even make public appearances explaining or justifying his work.In his first public appearance after the conclusion of his investigation, Mueller had said that he had hoped his report would speak for itself. When he later testified to House lawmakers, he was similarly careful not to stray beyond the report’s findings or offer new evidence.But that buttoned-up approach created a void for others, including at the Justice Department, to place their own stamp on his work. Even before the report was released Attorney General William Barr issued a four-page summary document that Mueller said did not adequately capture the gravity of his team’s findings.

Trump Set to Visit Wounded US Troops at Military Hospital

U.S. President Donald Trump planned to visit American service members Saturday at an army hospital outside Washington, the White House said.Trump said he would wear a mask during his visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, telling Fox News that “it’s a very appropriate thing” to do in a hospital setting.The president said that in addition to meeting with wounded soldiers, he would meet with workers tasked with containing the spread of the new coronavirus.Trump has been criticized for not wearing a mask or promoting the use of them, even within his Republican Party in recent weeks.It was unclear whether Trump would be photographed wearing a mask, since such visits are often closed to the media to shield the privacy of the wounded soldiers.His visit with the troops and employees comes amid surges of COVID-19 cases in the U.S., which continues to lead the world in both infections and fatalities.More than 3.2 million people in the U.S. were infected with the virus as of Saturday, about one-quarter of the almost 12.6 million cases worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University statistics.The more than 134,000 deaths in the U.S. represent over one-fourth of the nearly 562,000 COVID-19 fatalities throughout the world.Trump last visited Walter Reed in November 2019. The visit was unscheduled and secretive, and was described by the White House as an “interim checkup” nine months after his previous medical examination.The White House dismissed speculation about any “urgent or acute” issues involving Trump’s health. 

US Warns Citizens of Heightened Detention Risks in China

The U.S. State Department warned American citizens on Saturday to “exercise increased caution” in China due to heightened risk of arbitrary law enforcement including detention and a ban from exiting the country.”U.S. citizens may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime,” the State Department said in a security alert issued to its citizens in China, adding that U.S. citizens may face “prolonged interrogations and extended detention” for reasons related to state security.”Security personnel may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for sending private electronic messages critical of the Chinese government,” it added, without citing specific examples. The state department also did not say what prompted the security alert.The security alert comes as bilateral tensions intensify over issues ranging from the COVID-19 pandemic, trade, the new Hong Kong security law and allegations of human rights violations against Uighurs in the Xinjiang region.Washington and Beijing recently exchanged visa bans against each other’s officials, underscoring the deteriorating relations.The Chinese foreign ministry could not be immediately reached for comment outside of business hours on Saturday. Beijing called on Wednesday a similar warning issued by Australia about the risk of arbitrary detention in China “completely ridiculous and disinformation.”

Biden Forges Brand of Liberal Populism to Use Against Trump

Joe Biden stood in a Pennsylvania metal works shop, just miles from his boyhood home, and pledged to define his presidency by a sweeping economic agenda beyond anything Americans have seen since the Great Depression and the industrial mobilization for World War II.The prospective Democratic presidential nominee promised the effort would not just answer a pandemic-induced recession, but address centuries of racism and systemic inequalities with “a new American economy” that “finally and fully (lives) up to the words and the values enshrined in the founding documents of this nation — that we’re all created equal.”  It was a striking call coming from Biden, a 77-year-old establishment figure known more as a back-slapping deal-maker than visionary reformer. But it made plain his intention to test the reach of liberal populism as he tries to create a coalition that can defeat President Donald Trump in November.  Presidential Polls Give Biden Wide Lead on Trump Even with the US presidential election still four months away, polls can tell us a lot about the direction of a campaign and what it needs to do to win more votesTrump and his Republican allies argue that Biden’s positioning, especially his ongoing work with progressives, proves he’s captive to a “radical” left wing. Conversely, activists who backed Bernie Sanders or Elizabeth Warren in the Democratic primary were encouraged, yet cautious, about Biden’s ability to follow through while conceding that his plans on issues including climate action and criminal justice still fall short of their ideals.  Biden’s inner circle insists his approach in 2020 is the same it’s been since he was elected to the Senate in 1972: Meet the moment.”He’s always evolved,” said Ted Kaufman, Biden’s longest-serving adviser. “The thing that’s been consistent for his entire career, almost 50 years, is he never promises things that he doesn’t think he can do.”Kaufman, who succeeded Biden in the Senate when he ascended to the vice presidency, said Biden’s core identity hasn’t changed: “progressive Democrat,” friendly to labor and business, consistent supporter of civil rights, believer in government and the private sector. What’s different in 2020, he said, are the country’s circumstances — a public health crisis, near-Depression level unemployment, a national reckoning on racism — and the office Biden now seeks.  “If you want to get something done, encourage it,” Kaufman said. “What he learned over history watching campaigns is that you put forth a program, and then you come into office, and everybody involved knows that’s the program you’re offering.”Biden’s evolution has been on display from the start of his campaign as he’s tacked left both in substance and style while trying to preserve his pragmatist brand.  At the start of the Democratic primary, Biden was positioned as offering a moderate alternative to Sanders’ call for a “political revolution” and Warren’s push for “big structural change.”  The former vice president countered their proposed universal government-funded health insurance with a government insurance plan that would compete alongside private insurance. Progressives wanted tuition-free public higher education; Biden offered tuition subsidies for two-year schools. Biden called the climate crisis an “existential threat” and offered a clean energy plan with a trillion-dollar price tag, but resisted the full version of progressives’ Green New Deal. He promised hefty tax hikes for corporations and the investor class but opposed a “wealth tax” on individuals’ net worth.  Biden noted that his health care platform put him to the left of 2016 nominee Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama, who had jettisoned a “public option” from his 2010 health care law, angering liberal Democrats.  And on race, even before the recent national uprising against police violence, Biden spoke often of the nation’s systemic failure “to live up to” the Declaration of Independence. “Thomas Jefferson didn’t,” he said often in early speeches, alluding to the fact that the Declaration’s author and the third U.S. president owned slaves.  Still, Biden isn’t immune from the kind of internal party tensions that cost Clinton progressive support in 2016, and he’s spent the last three months shoring up his left flank.  Biden and Sanders created policy groups to write recommendations for Democrats’ 2020 platform. Those committees unveiled 110 pages of policy plans Wednesday, ahead of Biden’s speech in Pennsylvania. They left Biden short of endorsing single-payer health insurance and the most aggressive timelines to achieve a carbon-neutral economy, but ratified his claims of a more progressive slate than his predecessors’.Further, Biden already had moved toward Sanders’ tuition position, endorsing four years of full subsidies for most middle-class households. He adopted Warren’s proposed bankruptcy law overhaul and her ideas for a government procurement campaign to benefit U.S. companies.  Progressives promise continued pressure.  “I think our job is really to sometimes push him,” Washington Rep. Pramila Jayapal said. Jayapal, who helped lead the Biden-Sanders health care task force, said that means being “alongside him, of course, and then sometimes be out in front.”Likewise, Varshini Prakash of the Sunrise Movement, a leading environmental advocacy group, said her group won’t abandon the Green New Deal. But she credited Biden for embracing a level of public investment that would remake the energy economy during the pandemic recession.  Biden has managed party unity that wasn’t present four years ago.”I don’t consider Biden’s proposals a political hat tip to progressives as much as rising to the moment we’re living in,” said Adam Green, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee and a Warren ally.  The former vice president also has amassed an impressive slate of endorsements and built a stable of regular campaign surrogates, including all his major primary rivals. Many of them held events in the hours and days following his speech Thursday in a show of force that Trump, even with his intense online presence and fervent base, would be hard-pressed to match.For his part, Trump accused Biden of “plagiarizing” his economic populism but also tarred Biden as a leftist who can’t win.”It’s a plan that is very radical left, but he said the right things because he’s copying what I’ve done,” Trump said Friday before departing the White House for Florida.  Kaufman said Biden will continue campaigning as a nominee unconcerned about such labels. “What’s allowed him to survive all these years,” Kaufman said, “is that he’s not into any of those characterizations.” 

Pandemic Worsens in US

The coronavirus pandemic continues to worsen in the United States. On Friday, the country reported more than 65,000 new infections, the latest in a number of record-breaking days.Georgia, Iowa, Montana, North Carolina, Ohio, and Utah set records for daily reports of new infections.The World Health Organization’s emergencies program chief said Friday that the new coronavirus may be here to stay.“In the current situation, it is unlikely we can eradicate the virus,” Dr. Mike Ryan said Friday at the WHO’s regular coronavirus briefing in Geneva.The world could “potentially avoid the worst of having second peaks and having to move backwards in terms of a lockdown” if surges in infections can be extinguished, he added.WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus offered a word of optimism, saying examples around the world have shown that even if the COVID-19 pandemic is “very intense,” it can still be brought back under control.”But Tedros noted that global cases of infections worldwide have more than doubled in the last six weeks alone.The WHO formally acknowledged Thursday that the coronavirus could be spread through the air in crowded, closed or poorly ventilated environments, after initially dismissing the possibility.Australian and U.S. scientists, backed by more than 200 others, wrote this week that studies show “beyond any reasonable doubt that viruses are released during exhalation, talking and coughing in microdroplets small enough to remain aloft in the air.”Motorist wait in lines to get tested at a drive-thru coronavirus testing site at South Mountain Community College, July 9, 2020, in Phoenix, Arizona.More than 12.4 million people have contracted the virus worldwide, according to statistics published Friday by Johns Hopkins University.Many public health experts believe, however, that the number of infections is higher, but many cases go unreported due to a variety of factors, including testing shortages, the lack of transparency among some governments, and COVID-19 deaths attributed to related complications.The U.S. remains the hardest-hit country, with about a quarter of all confirmed infections and fatalities worldwide. As of Friday, 3.1 million people in the U.S. had contracted the coronavirus and more than 134,000 had died from the disease, according to the Johns Hopkins data.Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, who announced earlier this week that she has contracted the coronavirus, has made mask-wearing mandatory in her city.Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said in a statement that Bottoms’ order is “nonbinding and legally unenforceable.”Anthony S. Fauci, the top U.S. infectious-disease expert, has warned the pandemic is worsening in the U.S. because the country lacks a coherent strategy to contain the virus.“As a country, when we compare ourselves to other countries, I don’t think you can say we are doing great — I mean, we’re just not,” Fauci said in a recent interview with FiveThirtyEight.Fauci suggested earlier this week that states struggling to combat the virus “should seriously look at shutting down,” despite state efforts to reopen in order to revive their economies.Despite the surge in coronavirus cases in the U.S., President Donald Trump continues to push for the country’s schools to open in the coming weeks. Questions remain about how safe that will be for the children and school personnel.While it is generally believed that the virus does not affect children as adversely as it does adults, children have contracted the virus, and some have died.A Guarani Mimbya Indigenous woman waits to be tested for COVID-19 by health workers from the Butantan Institute in Cananeia, Brazil, July 10, 2020.In Hong Kong, schools will close Monday, beginning the system’s summer vacation period a week sooner than planned. Schools had been closed earlier in the year because of the coronavirus outbreak but were gradually reopened in May. The latest closing follows a spike in new COVID-19 cases, 34 on Thursday and 38 on Friday.The U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet on Friday called the situation in Lebanon “rapidly getting out of control.” The pandemic has exacerbated the worst economic crisis in Lebanon’s history, she said, and the country’s most vulnerable citizens “risk starvation as a result of this crisis.”Bachelet called on the Lebanese government to implement “urgent reforms” to meet “the basic needs of the population.”Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu admitted Friday the decision to allow bars and other businesses to reopen may have been “too soon.” His admission was made as the country’s health ministry reported 1,500 new cases, a record single-day high.A bus driver died in France on Friday. He was beaten earlier this week in Bayonne by passengers who refused his request that they wear face masks, which are mandatory in France on public transportation.  

COVID-19 Vaccine Faces Challenge of Confidence

The economy will not fully recover until a vaccine against COVID-19 is available, experts say.But once a vaccine is available, polls show one-quarter to one-third of Americans don’t plan to get it.That means bringing the pandemic to an end and getting people back to work is not just a medical science challenge. It’s a social science challenge, too.And while billions of dollars are going into solving the medical issues, none of it is earmarked to address the social issues, according to a new report.”You can’t just have a clinically successful vaccine. You have to have a socially acceptable vaccine,” said co-author Monica Schoch-Spana, a cultural anthropologist and senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.Scientists are moving at unprecedented speed to develop a safe and effective vaccine against the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. But “there wasn’t enough forethought about the importance of understanding the human factors,” Schoch-Spana said.So she and 22 co-authors, including prominent epidemiologists, vaccinologists and social scientists, put together the report to show where to fill the gaps.”In light of the high stakes, and the charged social environment, there have to be extra measures taken,” she said.Politically chargedVaccine opponents have been “very, very effective at connecting their anti-vaccine movement with some of the political issues” around COVID-19, protesting against lockdowns and refusing to wear masks, noted L.J. Tan, co-chair of the National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit, a public-private vaccine advocacy coalition.Some of the messaging from the Trump administration has not helped build confidence, either, Schoch-Spana said.For example, naming the vaccine program Operation Warp Speed gives the impression that swiftness is more important than safety.The administration has undermined medical experts by continuing to insist that the drug hydroxychloroquine is effective against COVID-19 when gold-standard studies have found it is not. Suggesting ultraviolet light or bleach as treatments hasn’t helped, either, Schoch-Spana’s report said.One poll has found that an endorsement from President Donald Trump would make 36 percent of respondents less likely to get a vaccine, compared with 14 percent who would be more likely.Barbershop epidemiologyCommunities of color who are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 are also the most hesitant to get vaccinated. Polls have found from 25 percent to 44 percent of African Americans say they would not get a vaccine.It’s partly a result of unethical medical experiments on African Americans in the 20th century, “a legacy of malfeasance and malpractice feeding mistrust today,” Schoch-Spana said, in addition to present-day discrimination they face from the health system.Health officials are getting past the mistrust by connecting with local nonprofits, churches, community groups, even hair salons and barbershops, which can be champions for vaccination.”Those places are where people congregate and share information and, by the way, make health decisions,” Schoch-Spana said.With influenza season coming up, health officials are aiming to ramp up those and other channels. The goal, as Tan puts it, is to take flu out of the equation because seasonal flu on top of a second wave of COVID-19 would push the health system to the brink.”We’ve got existing infrastructure and existing systems that we know work, but they’re not working well,” he added. Communities of color get flu vaccines at lower rates than other groups. If officials can improve those systems, they can leverage them for COIVD-19 as well, Tan said.Not persuasiveConnecting with trusted community members is likely to be more effective than education campaigns aimed at increasing confidence in vaccines, or appealing to people’s sense of altruism, according to University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill health behavior professor Noel Brewer.”The research is fairly clear that persuasion approaches are not all that effective for vaccination,” he said. Brewer co-authored a separate report on vaccine hesitancy.”What is effective in increasing vaccination is establishing systems that are easy to use and reach many people,” he added.That could include delivering vaccines in unusual places, including churches, community centers and mobile clinics, Schoch-Spana said.”It isn’t just enough to go to the convenient pharmacies in the community,” she noted. “It’s also about going to places that people can access readily and feel comfortable, safe and familiar to them.”When a vaccine arrives, there will not be enough for everyone, at least initially.”So there have to be decisions made about who gets to stand in line first for that limited set of doses,” Schoch-Spana said. “That’s not just a technical question. That’s also a question that’s informed by social values.”In the current politically charged environment, those decisions need to be made with transparency and accountability, she said. “The systems have to be built so that they are fair, and people need to recognize that they are fair.”There could be additional upsides to getting it right, she added.”If we do this vaccination program well, we will not only protect people’s health,” Schoch-Spana said. “We will regain people’s trust in institutions like government and public health and vaccine science.” 

Trump Says He Will Grant Road to Citizenship for Young Migrants 

U.S. President Donald Trump says he will soon sign an executive order on immigration that includes a path to citizenship for young immigrants who arrived in the United States illegally when they were children.In an interview with Spanish-language television network Telemundo, Trump said “DACA is going to be just fine,” referring to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program under which young migrants have been allowed to stay in the United States temporarily.”We’re going to have a road to citizenship,” he said.However, this “does not include amnesty,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said in a statement after Trump’s television interview.The White House statement said the executive order would establish a merit-based immigration system and reiterated that Trump would work with Congress on a legislative solution that “could include citizenship, along with strong border security and permanent merit-based reforms,” but no amnesty.Ivania Castillo from Prince William County, Va., holds a banner to show her support for dreamer Miriam from California, June 18, 2020, in Washington.The Trump administration has previously tried to end DACA, an Obama-era program that protects more than 700,000 immigrants.Trump did not give details about the larger immigration order he says he plans to sign, only saying that it “will include DACA, and I think people are going to be very happy.”When asked if the measure will be an executive order, as opposed to a congressional bill, Trump said the Supreme Court gave him “tremendous powers” to pass an executive order when they ruled on DACA last month.The court’s ruling said that the administration had not given adequate justification to rescind DACA. The court’s ruling did not say whether DACA recipients have a permanent right to live in the United States and did not prevent Trump from trying again to end the program.Deere said Trump is “working on an executive order to establish a merit-based immigration system to further protect U.S. workers.” Trump said he plans to sign it in the next four weeks.“The president has long said he is willing to work with Congress on a negotiated legislative solution to DACA, one that could include citizenship, along with strong border security and permanent merit-based reforms,” Deere said in a statement.Republican Senator Ted Cruz criticized Trump’s plans, saying in a tweet, “There is ZERO constitutional authority for a President to create a ‘road to citizenship’ by executive fiat.”Congressional lawmakers have tried on several occasions in recent years to pass comprehensive immigration reform but failed over deep divisions between Republican and Democratic proposals.